Harry Glick
Harry Glick
Master Combat Sambo

Dedicated to helping people stay safe

For more than 40 years, I have enjoyed a successful career in law. During that entire time, I've studied and practiced all aspects of martial arts. I’ve also trained a number of students.

I plan to use all of my martial arts training to pursue a lifelong goal—teaching women how to defend themselves in the event they are accosted by a violent attacker.

Of course, I also train men. But violence against women has increased steadily in recent years. So I’m actively focused on helping all women—from teens to women at mid-life and even beyond—to stay safe anywhere, at any time of the day or night.

Martial arts training

I’ve always loved participating in sports. As a teenager growing up in Brooklyn, New York, I was fascinated by boxing and by the martial arts. After discovering that there are hundreds of types of martial arts and styles, I wanted to study as many as I could. All schools tend to focus on one art. I wanted to learn more.

I began taking boxing lessons at the age of 15, and added karate and Tae Kwan Do to my fight training during college and while studying law at Fordham University.

I sought out and studied with the top masters of various disciplines. Among the fighting styles I’ve studied—sometimes multiple times:

  • Judo—Called “the gentle art,” Judo is a relatively new form of Japanese martial arts created in 1882. It focuses on throwing opponents on the ground and subduing or immobilizing them
  • Jiu-jitsu—Japanese martial art that emphasizes joint locks, strangles, and hand-to-hand combat
  • Tae Kwon Do—Korean art of self-defense that is more than 2,000 years old; it’s the most widely practiced martial art in the world. Besides judo, Tae Kwan Do is the only martial art represented in the Olympics. Training involves learning a system of blocks, kicks, punches, and open-handed strikes, as well as varying forms of take-downs, throws, and joint locks
  • Ninpo—A type of self-defense developed in feudal Japan and used by stealth assassins
  • Combat Sambo—A deadly form of combat used by Russian special forces almost exclusively for killing
  • Brazillian jiu-jitsu—Grappling on the ground
  • Philippine martial arts—Training in how to use weapons—e.g., knives, sticks, clubs or anything in your hand

Mental preparedness

Self-defense involves both physical and mental components. “Breathe. Relax. Stay calm.”

Self Defense for Smart Women

These are the instructions I give to all students at every session. To follow these guidelines myself, I have studied extensively—and still do. I’ve sought training in all of the following (and have taught meditation, as well):

  • Korean meditation
  • Kaballah
  • Mindful-based stress reduction
  • Buddhist philosophy
  • Chinese meditation

Honors and awards

One of the greatest honors I’ve received was having trained personally and awarded the title of Master Combat Sambo by Grandmaster Alex Barakov of St. Petersburg, Russia.

In addition, I hold black belts in four other martial arts disciplines:

  • Tae Kwon Do
  • Goshin – Budo Jo-Jitsu
  • Genbukan Ninpo Bugei- Dojo system
  • Assayama Ichi-Den

I’m fortunate to have been recognized by the Florida Martial Arts Hall of Fame in the following ways:

  • Named “Self Defense Instructor of the Year”
  • A recipient of the “Outstanding Leadership Award;” and
  • Honored with the “Silver Lifetime Achievement Award.”

While I’ve worked full-time as a practicing attorney, I have also enjoyed teaching students and conducting self-defense seminars for various organizations and women’s groups. Among them:

  • The Nassau County Women’s Bar Association
  • New York State Office of the Medicaid Inspector General, Division of Medicaid Investigations
  • New York Department of Health, Division of Legal Affairs, 2019 Semi-Annual Meeting and Continuing Legal Education
  • The Business and Professional Women’s Club of Nassau County
  • Pathways Women’s Health Center of Long Island
  • Gerontology Professionals of Long Island
  • The New York State Bar Association Elder Law meeting in Toronto
  • The Independent Business Women’s Circle